Formal Classic Chinese Style Luxury 2 Piece Music Room Set (Guqin Table and Stool)

1 month ago

Lot No. :ZQNF-191216
Feature:GuQin(1*), Phoebe zhennan S. Lee. (2*),mortise and tenon (3*). Listing includ a guqin table and a stool. The guqin table size118x45x80cm, the stool size 45x45x47cm.
Status:For sale (Item is customizable)
1* The guqin is a plucked seven-string Chinese musical instrument of the zither family. It has been played since ancient times, and has traditionally been favoured by scholars and literati as an instrument of great subtlety and refinement, as highlighted by the quote "a gentleman does not part with his qin or se without good reason" . The guqin is not to be confused with the guzheng, another Chinese long zither also without frets, but with moveable bridges under each string. The guqin is a very quiet instrument, with a range of about four octaves, and its open strings are tuned in the bass register. Its lowest pitch is about two octaves below middle C, or the lowest note on the cello. Sounds are produced by plucking open strings, stopped strings, and harmonics. The use of glissando—sliding tones—gives it a sound reminiscent of a pizzicato cello, fretless double bass or a slide guitar. The qin is also capable of a lot of harmonics, of which 91 are most commonly used and indicated by the dotted positions. By tradition the qin originally had five strings, but ancient qin-like instruments with 10 or more strings have been found. The modern form has been standardized for about two millennia.
2* Phoebe Zhennan is a large species of tree up to 30 metres tall in the Lauraceae family. Zhennan was originally a Chinese word that related to its Chinese name 楠 (Nan). The species is under second-class national protection in China.
3* The mortise and tenon joint has been used for thousands of years by woodworkers around the world to join pieces of wood, mainly when the adjoining pieces connect at an angle of 90°. In its basic form it is both simple and strong. This is an ancient joint dating back 7,000 years. In traditional Chinese architecture, wood components, such as beams, brackets, roof frames and struts, were made to interlock with perfect fit, without using fasteners or glues, enabling the wood to expand and contract according to humidity. Archaeological evidence from Chinese sites shows that, by the end of the Neolithic, mortise-and-tenon joinery was employed in Chinese construction.


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