A Golden Cape Pendant of Royal Family Women, Song Dynasty

3 weeks ago

Lot No. :JG-190926
Centuries of Style:Southern Song dynasty of Song dynasty (1*).
Feature:A golden (2*) cape pendant of aristocratic women.
Source:Private collection
1* The Song dynasty (960–1279) was an era of Chinese history that is divided into two distinct periods, Northern (960–1127) and Southern (1127–1279). The Song government was the first in world history to issue banknotes or true paper money nationally and the first Chinese government to establish a permanent standing navy. This dynasty also saw the first known use of gunpowder, as well as the first discernment of true north using a compass. Social life during the Song was vibrant. Citizens gathered to view and trade precious artworks, the populace intermingled at public festivals and private clubs, and cities had lively entertainment quarters. The spread of literature and knowledge was enhanced by the rapid expansion of woodblock printing and the 11th-century invention of movable-type printing. Technology, science, philosophy, mathematics, and engineering flourished over the course of the Song. Philosophers such as Cheng Yi and Zhu Xi reinvigorated Confucianism with new commentary, infused with Buddhist ideals, and emphasized a new organization of classic texts that brought out the core doctrine of Neo-Confucianism.
2* Gold in ancient China was a symbol of identity and status, and was mainly used by royalty and nobility as auspicious blessings and exquisite ornamentations, which were ‘in style’. China began to exploit gold as early as the Shang Dynasty. The Warring States Period saw maturation of the gilting technique, and during the Han Dynasty, the techniques for molten gold were mastered to transform them into beads and threads. The Ming and Qing imperial rulers set up gold and silver vessel production workshops, focusing on the delicate filaments and gem embedding, advancing fine gold skills in the "filigree mosaic" to the extreme.


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